Big Sky Conference

Details of Montana head coach Bobby Hauck’s three-year contract

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With the approval of his latest contract by the Montana Board of Regents, and his first since 2009, new Montana head football coach Bobby Hauck is the highest paid college coach in terms of base salary in the Treasure State.

Hauck, 53, coached Montana from 2003 until 2009. During his first seven-year tenure, he was on year-to-year contracts. Hauck’s salary at Montana peaked with a base of $144,500 his final season in Missoula. Hauck posted an 80-17 record his first stint in Missoula that included 31 Big Sky Conference wins in his final 32 league contests.

Former Montana head coach Bobby Hauck/ (Aaron Mayes / UNLV Photo Services)

Hauck, officially hired on December 1, signed a 3-year contract with a base salary of $185,000 last week. The contract also includes guarantees for the Montana Coaches’ Show radio program and the Grizzly Sports Report television show. Hauck will receive a guarantee of $35,000 for his media duties. Montana State head coach Jeff Choate earns $35,000 total for similar programs produced by Learfield Sports.

The contract begins at an undetermined date as of publication and ends on January 31 of 2021. Along with his media guarantees, Hauck will also receive a $500 per month stipend for his personal automobile. He will also receive a guaranteed bonus of $20,000 for public appearances, attending Grizzly Scholarship Association events, and giving public speeches at “all reasonably requested UM athletics and GSA functions, subject to the Coach’s head coaching duties under this agreement.”

Choate receives a $25,000 guarantee for a similar clause that also includes ticket sales campaigns. Choate’s guaranteed salary was $245,000 when he signed the deal on January 1 of 2016. Assuming the standard 3-percent raise each of the last two years from the state, Choate will make a guaranteed $256,500 in his final year of his first contract at MSU.

Hauck’s guaranteed first-year salary is $240,000.

Hauck’s contract is also packed with annual performance incentives as well, including academic performance incentives totaling Montana athletic director Kent Haslam promised would be included when Hauck was hired. The academic bonuses are also given to Hauck’s assistant coaches.

Montana’s team cumulative grade-point average during Bob Stitt’s three academic years at the helm was 2.89.

Other performance incentives in Hauck’s contract include:

  • A $4,000 bonus for Hauck each semester that the football team has a cumulative grade-point average between 2.85 and 2.99. Each of Hauck’s assistants will earn a $500 bonus each.
  • A $6,000 bonus for Hauck each semester that the football team has a cumulative grade-point average between 3.00 and 3.09. Each of Hauck’s assistants will earn a $1,000 bonus each.
  • A $7,500 bonus for Hauck each semester that the football team has a cumulative grade-point average of 3.10 or above. Each of Hauck’s assistants will earn a $2,000 bonus each.

According to the contract, the parties acknowledge that the bonuses for GPA performance are not cumulative.

  • A $7,500 bonus for Hauck if the Griz maintain a four-year academic progress rating score of at least 950 as determined by the yearly NCAA APR report. Each of Hauck’s assistants will earn a $1,000 bonus each.
  • A $7,500 bonus for Hauck if the Griz maintain a graduation success rate (GSR) each year that is equal to or higher than the over all Division I GSR for the same year as determined by the yearly NCAA Federal Graduation Rate/GSR report. Each of Hauck’s assistants will earn a $1,000 bonus each.
  • A $3,000 bonus for Hauck if “the most current APR reports no ‘0-for-2’ football student-athletes Each of Hauck’s assistants will earn a $500 bonus each.

Montana athletic director Kent Haslam/by Brooks Nuanez

“When we started talking about incentives for assistant coaches, Coach Hauck talked about including the assistant coaches on that academic incentives and I had already thought about that as well,” Montana athletic director Kent Haslam said on Tuesday night. “That was something we both felt was a good way to incentivize because assistant coaches spent as much if not more time with student-athletes. Incentivizing them to focus in on grade-point averages, academic progress rates, graduation rates as well as the athletic incentives, they also have a vested interest.

“I don’t think it will change the motivation of our assistant coaches because they have all been so great about focusing on on the overall development of the student-athletes. But it does send a message that these are important.”

Other non-academic performance incentives includes:

  • $5,000 if the Griz maintain or increase season attendance.
  • $5,000 if Hauck earns Big Sky Conference Coach of the Year.
  • $5,000 if the Griz defeat an NCAA Football Championship Subdivision team during the non-conference season that has been a qualifier in the FCS playoffs within the past two years. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,000 bonuses each. Montana plays FCS playoff qualifiers Northern Iowa and Western Illinois next season.
  • $15,000 if the Griz play an NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision team during the non-conference season. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,000 bonuses each. Montana’s next opponent is Oregon on Sept. 14 of 2019.
  • $10,000 if the Griz defeat an NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision team during the non-conference season. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,000 bonuses each.
  • $5,000 if the Griz achieve 10 or more wins during the season including the regular and postseason. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,000 bonuses each.
  • $5,000 if the Griz finish the regular season as conference champions, co-champions or qualify for the FCS playoffs. Hauck’s assistants will receive $2,500 bonuses each.
  • $2,500 if the Griz advance to the second round of the FCS playoffs either by victory or via a bye. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,250 bonuses each.
  • $2,500 if the Griz advance to the quarterfinals of the FCS playoffs. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,250 bonuses each.
  • $2,500 if the Griz advance to the semifinals of the FCS playoffs. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,250 bonuses each.
  • $5,000 if the Griz advance to the quarterfinals of the FCS playoffs. Hauck’s assistants will receive $1,250 bonuses each.
  • $30,000 if the Griz win the FCS national championship. Hauck’s assistants will receive $5,000 bonuses each.

Montana athletic director Kent Haslam/ by Colter Nuanez

Each performance bonus will be paid in a lump sum to Hauck and his staff within 60 days of attainment. If Hauck were to hit all of his academic and performance incentives and lead the Grizzlies to the FCS national championship in 2018, he would make $344,000 including his media guarantee.

In 2019, if Hauck were to achieve all bonuses and lead Montana to a win over Oregon, his maximum salary would jump to $374,000 including his media guarantee because other non-conference opponents South Dakota and Monmouth made the 2017 FCS playoffs. His assistant coaches have the potential to make $21,000 in bonuses annually.

If the contract is “terminated by either party for any reason, or for no reason, or if Hauck is relieved of his duties, the coach will be paid any incentive earned as of the date of termination or discontinuance of his duties within sixty days of the date the incentive is earned.”

Clause 5C of the contract spells out the bonuses for camps and clinics put on by Hauck during the summer. Haslam must be consulted, along with UM President Seth Bodnar, for the amount of camps and the type of compensation received by Hauck and the camp’s working personnel. The revenue gathered from the camps can be distributed to Hauck and among his staff.

The contract includes two clauses — Clause 3d and Clause 4b — not included in any other head coaching contract at UM.

Clause 3d under the duties section reads:

  • The University and Coach will work to create an atmosphere where assistant coaches and student athletes understand and embrace the following:

∙ Student athletes benefit by having the opportunity to develop potential as skilled performers; to grow emotionally, socially and intellectually; to travel and represent UM Intercollegiate Athletics; and to learn to be productive team members;

∙ At the same time, because of the public nature of competition, student athletes are more visible to the community than non‐athlete peers;

∙ Student athletes are representatives of the University of Montana and Intercollegiate Athletics;

∙ It is expected that student athletes will conduct themselves in a manner that brings pride to the team, the department, the campus, and the community;

∙ The University expects student athletes to train and strive for athletic excellence, to demonstrate academic honesty and integrity, to respect fellow students and athletes, and to conduct themselves as responsible citizens.

“We in the athletic department felt like getting that statement into a contract is important and it clearly states what we expect,” Haslam said. “I can tell you that this is something we want to insert into all of our coach contracts, not simply the football coach. This gives an opportunity to clearly state this and it can be something we go back to when we do evaluations.”

Clause 4b under the ‘Conduct of the UM football program” clause reads:

  • Coach, assistant coaches, others who report directly or indirectly to Coach, and student athletes shall foster a culture of collaboration within the department, across campus, and within the community.

This shall include, but not be limited to the following:

∙ Student athlete annual bystander intervention training

∙ Student athlete annual training on the Student‐Athlete Conduct Code, Student Conduct Code and the University Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Stalking and Retaliation policy and procedures and how those policies relate to one another

∙ Football staff training on the Student Athlete Conduct Code, Student Conduct Code and the University Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Stalking and Retaliation policy and procedures and how those policies relate to one another

“Again, it’s important to clearly state it,” Haslam said. “These are things we do regularly but now it holds the coach and the administration accountable that this is getting done and follow up on. It’s a good reminder. There are so many great avenues for training already on this campus that our student athletes are integrated fully. But there is some unique trainings we do within athletics that are important of student-athletes as well.

“This isn’t being inserted into the football coach’s contract. It’s important for all coaches. It’s a good reminder for us to always think on what our core values are.”

Other clauses in the contract include: Hauck must inform UM athletics if he is looking for other jobs if more than six months remain on his existing deal; Hauck must provide income and revenue statements for the program each September; Hauck can be terminated at any time but must be provided written notice and given a week to appeal; If fired, Hauck would still receive a pro-rated salary until the contract’s completion but he would have to pay back all liquidated damages that stem from his termination.

The 2018 season will mark the first as a head coach for Hauck since he resigned at UNLV at the end of the 2014 season. He has spent the last three seasons as the special teams coordinator and associate head coach at San Diego State. The former Montana track standout and Big Timber native started his coaching career as a graduate assistant on Don Read’s staff in 1988. He was a GA at UCLA from 1990 until 1992 before taking his first full-time assistant position at Northern Arizona in 1993. He spent 1995 until 1998 on Rick Neuheisel’s staff at Colorado before moving from CU to Washington with Neuheisel in 1999, where he stayed through 2002 before being hired as the head coach of his alma mater for the first time.

Kyle Sample acquired the contract via FOIA request and contributed to to this story. Photos attributed. All Rights Reserved. 

About Colter Nuanez

Colter Nuanez is the co-founder and senior writer for Skyline Sports. After spending six years in the newspaper industry with stops at the Missoulian, the Ellensburg Daily Record and the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, the former Washington Newspaper Association Sportswriter of the Year and University of Montana Journalism School graduate ('09) has cultivated a deep passion for sports journalism during his 13-year career covering the Big Sky Conference. In August of 2014, Colter and brother Brooks merged their passions of writing and art to found Skyline Sports.

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